Fact of the Day

April 16′s Fact of the Week

Apr 16 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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With the Pearl Harbor attacks, the United States government categorized Japanese American men as “4C” which meant that they were considered as “enemy aliens.” They became high security risks through sensationalized reports of sabotage and espionage and could not participate in the war efforts and/or subject to the draft. Excluded and treated as the enemies, Japanese American families on the west coast became victims of racial hostility and violence as their homes and businesses were vandalized, looted, and destroyed. Anti-Japanese sentiments soared both in American propaganda and neighborhoods that wanted the “Japs” out.

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April 9′s Fact of the Week

Apr 09 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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An instrumental part of the Asian American Studies movement, the Northwestern University Hunger Strike transpired after failed negotiations with the campus administration to create funding for Ethnic Studies and include more Asian American Studies courses. Students organized a hunger strike that lasted for 23 days and called for action on behalf of the campus administration to adhere to their demands. Most importantly, the strike aroused awareness and support from campuses across the country. 4 years later, the program established a minor in Asian American Studies at Northwestern. The students faced the possibility of arrest for illegal camping and one had been hospitalized for being seriously ill and suffered damage to his organs from not eating.

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April 2′s Fact of the Week

Apr 02 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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Sophy Soeung and Sam Nhang Nhem came to the United States as Cambodian American political refugees when Khmer Rouge murdered and oppressed millions of people. However, in 1993, a group of men approached Soeung and Nhem near their apartment that shouted, “I am going to knock that gook out” and taunted them as “gooks” before beating both of them. They knocked Nhem down and kicked his head repeatedly- he died 2 days later at the hospital, leaving his fiancé and 1-month-old son. At the trial, one of the assailants confessed that they only attacked them because they were Cambodian. He was sentenced to life in prison and charged with second-degree murder. Two others were charged with Soeung’s beating.

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March 25′s Fact of the Week

Mar 25 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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stopthehate

Another case similar to the murder of Vincent Chin, Jim Loo and his friends were at a pool hall in Raleigh, North Carolina when 2 men harassed and blamed Loo and his friends for outcome of the Vietnam War. The assailants mistook Loo as Vietnamese, although he was Chinese American, and shouted, “We should not put up with Vietnamese in our country” and continued to make racial slurs against him before shooting him outside of the pool hall. In response to the murder, the Asian American community, still scarred from the injustice from Chin’s case, mobilized and formed the Jim Loo American Justice Coalition to represent Loo’s parents and family. A year later, both men were sentenced. One with 37 years behind bars charged with second-degree murder, the latter with 4.

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March 18′s Fact of the Week

Mar 18 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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Loving v. Virginia was a landmark civil rights case that invalidated the decades of anti-miscegenation laws that previously prohibited interracial marriages. For a long time, Asian Americans couldn’t interracially marry (for the most part either labeled as “Mongolians” or “Malay”) and many stigmatized them for engaging in interracial relationships. Many times, those that found themselves in love with someone from another racial category were persecuted by their own community, harassed, beaten, and even murdered, because a lot of people felt that Asian Americans represented afactual threats to white racial purity and sanctity of traditional marriage.

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February 25′s Fact of the Week

Feb 25 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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Luyen Phan Nguyen was a 19-year-old Vietnamese American pre-med student at the University of Miami who immigrated to the United States with his family as refugees. While walking home to his apartment in Coral Springs, Florida, he was approached by 15 men that harassed and shouted at him racial slurs, such as “Chink” and “Viet Cong.” Despite his pleas for them to stop, the assailants kicked him to the ground and proceeded to beat him until he was lifeless. His death led Asian American activist organizations to issue pleas for tolerance and awareness against bias and racism. Bradley Mills, the one charged with the last kick to Nguyen’s neck that took his life, was sentenced to 50 years in prison.

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February 11/18′s Fact of the Week

Feb 11 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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Amidst the civil rights movement and rising activism with youths, Yuji Ichioka created the term “Asian American” and founded the Asian American Political Alliance to maintain a political identity designed to bring together people of different ethnicities and backgrounds to share a common voice to work together in solidarity to strive for change. The term was the first time that Asian Americans banded together their shared experience and identity to protest racism and discrimination in society. He was also the foremost scholar of Japanese American and Asian American history, and a founding member of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center. Professor Ichioka continued to inspire similar Asian American Studies departments around the country throughout his life.

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February 4′s Fact of the Week

Feb 04 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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chathamsquare

The Chatham Square Rally was part of a labor movement in New York that advocated for worker’s rights and anti-discrimination. When a corporation refused to hire Asian Americans because of their ethnicity to build Confucius Plaza, Asian Americans for Equal Employment (AAFEE) staged a demonstration that accused the refusal to hire as discriminatory and prejudiced. Together with garment workers and elderly groups, the outcome succeeded in getting over 40 Asian American workers hired that worked on the construction of Confucius Plaza.

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January 28′s Fact of the Week

Jan 28 2013
By: diane.wong
Categories: Blog, Advocacy, Blog, Fact of the Day
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1995 marked a series of New York City movements that resulted in the complete shut down of the East Side of Manhattan. To protest against acts of police brutality on minority groups- a bold collective of activists, grassroots organizers, and students from the Committee Against Anti-Asian Violence (CAAAV) occupied and blocked the Manhattan Bridge during rush hour for more than 2 hours. Other organizations occupied the Midtown Tunnel, National Congress, Brooklyn Bridge, and Williamsburg Bridge in unison. While many were arrested, the movements attracted nationwide attention and demonstrated the strength of grassroots mobilization and activism.

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